Weeks of April 15-19 & 22-26

Now that we’ve wrapped up our labor unionism presentations, we’re finally able to address the essential question that’s been with us for the month:

WHERE DOES THE WEEKEND COME FROM?

Mr. Cameron handed out the RUBRIC we will use for this essay that we’ll begin right after the presentations are complete, and ensured that students are on the right path to developing a strong essay. All of our essays will be accessible on this here Google Doc: “Where Does the Weekend Come From – Student Essay Groups”.

*This partner essay is DUE Tuesday, April 30* – 1st Period

*This partner essay is DUE Monday, May 6* – 4th Period

Noting the emphasis on incorporating EVIDENCE into your essays, don’t be shy in addressing the information found in the Labor Unionism Student Presentations, or the work you’ve completed on the Industrial Revolution:

  1. From Agriculture and Piecework to Industrialization.
    • Textbook Pages 283 – 286.
  2. Where did people move to and from during the Industrial Revolution?
  3. How did daily life move before and during the Industrial Revolution?
  4. How were individual working people affected by the Industrial Revolution?
  5. How did the Industrial Revolution move society backward?
  6. How did the Industrial Revolution move society forward?
  7. Commanding Capital During the Industrial Revolution
  8. Labor Unionism Lecture Notes.  And here’s the LECTURE.
  9. DBQ on Labor Unionism (not applicable in 2019)

Noting the struggles to reorganize wealth during the industrial revolution, we’ll spend some time during the CAASPP testing week to work through Differentiating Socioeconomic Systems, (using the Lecture on Capitalism, Socialism & Communism.)

Thursday & Friday! April 4-5

WHERE DOES THE WEEKEND COME FROM!?

Students broke into groups of no larger than two people to decide which of the following Labor Disputes in the United States during the late 1800’s – early 1900’s they wish to tackle.  Students will use this here Labor Unionism Presentation Skeleton to organize their Work.

Students should be aware of the presentation requirements, outlined here with the Labor Unionism Presentation RUBRIC.

HOMEWORK:

You and your partner will present on your choice of Labor Dispute upon our return from Spring Break.  It’s critical that you think about who is responsible for what slide/information so that you’re each clear on what you need to do.  Consult the RUBRIC.

At the beginning of class on Friday, students will  submit the following work in order:

  1. From Agriculture and Piecework to Industrialization.
  2. Where did people move to and from during the Industrial Revolution?
  3. How did daily life move before and during the Industrial Revolution?
  4. How were individual working people affected by the Industrial Revolution?
  5. How did the Industrial Revolution move society backward?
  6. How did the Industrial Revolution move society forward?
  7. Commanding Capital During the Industrial Revolution – The Great $ Trick
  8. Labor Unionism Lecture Notes.

Tuesday, April 2

Today’s class period is devoted to examining perspectives of working people living during the industrial revolution.  We’re running a simulation written in the early 1900’s entitled “The Great Money Trick” by Robert Tressell for an understanding of the effects of concentrated CAPITAL on the industrial workforce.  Students will organize their ideas using Commanding Capital During the Industrial Revolution!

As noted in a variety of primary sources during our recent inquiry into the industrial revolution, the development of business TRUSTS and MONOPOLIES concentrated capital to fuel efficient methods of industrial production.  As Samuel Smiles, author of the 1875 “Thrift” article we read yesterday in class described, “There is an accumulation of wealth in (England) to which past times can offer no parallel…And yet notwithstanding all this wealth, there is an enormous mass of poverty.”  How is it possible to generate so much new wealth yet still have such massive rates of poverty?  This is precisely the question “The Great Money Trick” seeks to answer.

As this video references the German sociologist George Simmel.  Note Robert Tressell had read, and was influenced by, his fellow European. They and the rest of planet earth inexorably tore into the 20th century; nobody could be neutral on this moving train, so some took to alter course.

Monday, April 1

WHERE DOES THE WEEKEND COME FROM?

Of course, we can’t really answer that question until we finish setting the stage of the Industrial Revolution – so let’s finish our inquiry into how the Industrial Revolution changed the lives of working people!  To help us further unpack this question, we’re going to spend today contrasting the ideas we were presented with earlier this week; while our most recent essential question was “how did the Industrial Revolution move society backward?” today our essential question is “how did the Industrial Revolution move society forward??”

To unpack this question, we’re taking a look at two sources:

By the end of class, students will read and annotate the two sources, and record their responses on this here graphic organizer: The Industrial Revolution!!!  Finishing this work will require students to reference all of the work they’ve completed this week.

HOMEWORK: