WK 18: Global Conflicts and Their Consequences

Unit 6: Accelerating Global Changes and Realignments – c. 1900 thru PRESENT

*Contemporary Era Key Concept Packet*

*Contemporary Regionally-Specific Groups*

my.ap.collegeboard.org MCQs and SAQs are available: “Unit 7 – Global Conflict”; “Unit 8 – Cold War & Decolonization”; “Unit 9 – Globalization”.

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Contemporary Era KC 2: Global Conflicts and Their Consequences.  Peoples and states around the world challenged the existing political and social order in varying ways, leading to unprecedented worldwide conflicts.

  • Map: Imperialism and migration during the 19th and early 20th centuries – Bentley pg. 933
  • Map: Imperialism in Africa c. 1914 –  pg. 923
  • Map: Imperialism in Oceania, c. 1914 –  pg. 926

  • Map: Imperialism in Asia c. 1914 –  pg. 918
  • Map: Struggling to control China c. 1927 thru 1936 – pg. 1011
  • Map: The Russian empire from 1801 thru 1914 – Bentley pg. 888
  • Map: Territorial losses of the Ottoman Empire from 1800 to 1923 – pg. 882

  • Samuel R. Williamson: The Origins of World War I
  • Map: The Great War in Europe and southwest Asia from 1914 thru 1918 – Bentley pg. 953
  • Map: Territorial changes in Europe after WWI – pg. 970
  • Map: Territorial changes in southwest Asia after WWI – pg. 973

  • Keep up with current events with strong contextualization of a critical geopolitical juncture:

WK 17: Science and the Environment in the 20th Century

Unit 6: Accelerating Global Changes and Realignments – c. 1900 thru PRESENT

Contemporary Era KC 1: Science and the Environment. Rapid advances in science and technology altered the understanding of the universe and the natural world and led to advances in communication, transportation, industry, agriculture, and medicine.

Winter Break Homework

Transitioning between the Modern and Contemporary eras requires us to inquire into the transformation in the way humans understand our own history, as well as the relationship between history and science.  Certainly, the 20th century saw wildly rapid and complex technological advancements – how did those advancements change the way we understand the past?  This historiographical question introduces the first Key Concept of the Contemporary Era – Science and the Environment – as it inquires into the rapid advances in science and technology that altered the understanding of the universe and the natural world and led to advances in communication, transportation, industry, agriculture, and medicine.

To introduce this Key Concept over Winter Break, students are to read David Christian‘s 2009 publication of “History and Science After the Chronometric Revolution” (pages 441-456 of embedded source), and respond to the following in preparation for a Socratic Seminar upon our return to school:

  • Define the terms ‘chronometric revolution,’ ‘taxonomies,’ and ‘historiography.’
  • Describe the relationship between “our taxonomies of knowledge” and the first chronometric revolution.  Describe the relationship between “our taxonomies of knowledge” and the second chronometric revolution.  Contrast the two ‘chronometric revolutions’ discussed.
  • (Annotate, along the way, for specific proper nouns #vocab that inform your understanding to the above questions, as well as the prompt below.)

Watch this here Crash Course video to clarify some of the ideas presented in David Christian’s essay, as it emphasizes important characteristics of the later Modern Era as a way to understand the development of the second chronometric revolution.   Browse these Alternative Periodic Tables to reemphasize how there are a LOT of ways to conceptualize our complex world.

Notice how this work, to an extent, returns to where we began class in Week 1.  Open the Week 1 link in a new tab.  Take out/start a fresh page of paper.  Scroll through that post from the beginning of the semester, and respond to the following:

  • Evaluate the extent to which the content addressed in Week 1 is addressed in the content of the Winter Break work.  Summarily, explain how all of this information applies far beyond this class.

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Thank you for volunteering to take an AP class!  Enjoy it.  Please single-space your work or neatly write it by hand.  Plan a study/work date with friends.  Learning is a social activity, and more fun with others.  Mr. C suggests students individually work through the reading and the bullet-point/SAQ-style prompts seen above the “Railroads” Crash Course video and then get together in a group to tackle the DBQ-style prompt seen below the Crash Course video.  And no, that doesn’t mean a group can submit a ‘group copy’ of work – everyone is responsible for their own work – this is all merely a suggestion of how to most effectively complete the work.

WK 16: Nationalism, Revolution, Reform, and Global Migrations

Unit 5: Industrialization and Global Integration c. 1750 – 1900: The ‘Modern’ Era

*The Modern Era Key Concept Packet*

  • Our regionally-specific groups and our primary source doc. choices.  Presentations begin Monday, and all completed slideshows will be shared by all groups.
  • Keep all that class- and homework organized in your AP World Binder.
  • After we finish our group presentations on Wednesday, students will sign up for their choice of the Contemporary Regionally-Specific Groups.  Thursday will be a designated study day…
  • In preparation for Friday’s Unit Exam of 45 stimulus-based Multiple Choice Qs and 2 SAQs from a choice of 4, consult “Unit 5: Revolutions” and “Unit 6: … Industrialization” MCQs and SAQs on my.ap.collegeboard.org.

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Modern Era KC 3: Nationalism, Revolution, and Reform. The 18th century marked the beginning of an intense period of revolution and rebellion against existing governments, leading to the establishment of new nation-states around the world.

 

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Modern Era KC 4: Global Migration. As a result of the emergence of transoceanic empires and a global capitalist economy, migration patterns changed dramatically, and the numbers of migrants increased significantly.

WK 15: Imperialism and Nation-State Formation

Unit 5: Industrialization and Global Integration c. 1750 – 1900: The ‘Modern’ Era

*The Modern Era Key Concept Packet*

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Modern Era KC 2: Imperialism and Nation-State Formation. As states industrialized, they also expanded existing overseas empires and established new colonies and transoceanic relationships.

  • Selected Documents Concerning Imperialism
  • Map: Napoleon’s empire in 1812 – Bentley pg. 794
  • Map: Westward expansion of the U.S. in the 19th cent. pg. 850
  • Map: The Dominion of Canada in the 19th Century – pg. 855
  • Map: The Russian empire from 1801 thru 1914 – Bentley pg. 888

  • Map: Imperialism in Asia c. 1914 – Bentley pg. 918

WK 14: Industrialization and Global Capitalism

Unit 5: Industrialization and Global Integration c. 1750 – 1900: The ‘Modern’ Era

*The Modern Era Key Concept Packet*

  • The Day before Thanksgiving Break, we will sign up for our regionally-specific groups and identify which primary source documents from your region you will read w’ your group (use this link).
  • Thanksgiving Break HW: simply print out your regionally-specific chapter outline and primary source documents (see links above).  That’s it!
  • Due Friday, Dec. 6: Regional Chapter Outline & annotations of primary sources.
  • Due to the chronologically disjointed nature of this Unit, there is no homework over the Dec. 7-8 weekend.

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Weeks 12 & 13: Early Modern State Consolidation and Imperial Expansion

Early Modern KC 3: State Consolidation and Imperial Expansion.  Empires expanded around the world, presenting new challenges in the incorporation of diverse populations and in the effective administration of new coerced labor systems.

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WK 11: New Forms of Social Organization & Modes of Production

Unit 4 c. 1450 – 1750: The Early Modern Era of Global Interaction

* Early Modern Era Key Concept Packet*

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Early Modern KC 2: New Forms of Social Organization and Modes of Production. Although the world’s productive systems continued to be heavily centered on agriculture, major changes occurred in agricultural labor, the systems and locations of manufacturing, gender and social structures, and environmental processes. 

WK 10: Globalizing Networks of Communication & Exchange

Unit 4 c. 1450 – 1750: The Early Modern Era of Global Interaction

* Early Modern Era Key Concept Packet*

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Early Modern KC1: Globalizing Networks of Communication and Exchange.  The interconnection of the Eastern and Western Hemispheres, made possible by transoceanic voyaging, transformed trade and religion and had a significant economic, cultural, social, and demographic impact on the world.

                  

WK 9: Increased Economic Productivity and Consequences

*The Post-Classical Era Key Concept HW Packet*

Here’s the Regionally-Specific Group Presentation SKELETON;  Your regionally-specific groups; keeping class- and homework organized w’ our AP World Binders.

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Post-Classical KC 3: Increased Economic Productive Capacity and its Consequences.  Changes in trade networks resulted from and stimulated increasing productive capacity, with important implications for social and gender structures and environmental processes.