Weeks of April 15-19 & 22-26

Now that we’ve wrapped up our labor unionism presentations, we’re finally able to address the essential question that’s been with us for the month:

WHERE DOES THE WEEKEND COME FROM?

Mr. Cameron handed out the RUBRIC we will use for this essay that we’ll begin right after the presentations are complete, and ensured that students are on the right path to developing a strong essay. All of our essays will be accessible on this here Google Doc: “Where Does the Weekend Come From – Student Essay Groups”.

*This partner essay is DUE Tuesday, April 30* – 1st Period

*This partner essay is DUE Monday, May 6* – 4th Period

Noting the emphasis on incorporating EVIDENCE into your essays, don’t be shy in addressing the information found in the Labor Unionism Student Presentations, or the work you’ve completed on the Industrial Revolution:

  1. From Agriculture and Piecework to Industrialization.
    • Textbook Pages 283 – 286.
  2. Where did people move to and from during the Industrial Revolution?
  3. How did daily life move before and during the Industrial Revolution?
  4. How were individual working people affected by the Industrial Revolution?
  5. How did the Industrial Revolution move society backward?
  6. How did the Industrial Revolution move society forward?
  7. Commanding Capital During the Industrial Revolution
  8. Labor Unionism Lecture Notes.  And here’s the LECTURE.
  9. DBQ on Labor Unionism (not applicable in 2019)

Noting the struggles to reorganize wealth during the industrial revolution, we’ll spend some time during the CAASPP testing week to work through Differentiating Socioeconomic Systems, (using the Lecture on Capitalism, Socialism & Communism.)

Thursday & Friday! April 4-5

WHERE DOES THE WEEKEND COME FROM!?

Students broke into groups of no larger than two people to decide which of the following Labor Disputes in the United States during the late 1800’s – early 1900’s they wish to tackle.  Students will use this here Labor Unionism Presentation Skeleton to organize their Work.

Students should be aware of the presentation requirements, outlined here with the Labor Unionism Presentation RUBRIC.

HOMEWORK:

You and your partner will present on your choice of Labor Dispute upon our return from Spring Break.  It’s critical that you think about who is responsible for what slide/information so that you’re each clear on what you need to do.  Consult the RUBRIC.

At the beginning of class on Friday, students will  submit the following work in order:

  1. From Agriculture and Piecework to Industrialization.
  2. Where did people move to and from during the Industrial Revolution?
  3. How did daily life move before and during the Industrial Revolution?
  4. How were individual working people affected by the Industrial Revolution?
  5. How did the Industrial Revolution move society backward?
  6. How did the Industrial Revolution move society forward?
  7. Commanding Capital During the Industrial Revolution – The Great $ Trick
  8. Labor Unionism Lecture Notes.

Tuesday, April 2

Today’s class period is devoted to examining perspectives of working people living during the industrial revolution.  We’re running a simulation written in the early 1900’s entitled “The Great Money Trick” by Robert Tressell for an understanding of the effects of concentrated CAPITAL on the industrial workforce.  Students will organize their ideas using Commanding Capital During the Industrial Revolution!

As noted in a variety of primary sources during our recent inquiry into the industrial revolution, the development of business TRUSTS and MONOPOLIES concentrated capital to fuel efficient methods of industrial production.  As Samuel Smiles, author of the 1875 “Thrift” article we read yesterday in class described, “There is an accumulation of wealth in (England) to which past times can offer no parallel…And yet notwithstanding all this wealth, there is an enormous mass of poverty.”  How is it possible to generate so much new wealth yet still have such massive rates of poverty?  This is precisely the question “The Great Money Trick” seeks to answer.

As this video references the German sociologist George Simmel.  Note Robert Tressell had read, and was influenced by, his fellow European. They and the rest of planet earth inexorably tore into the 20th century; nobody could be neutral on this moving train, so some took to alter course.

Monday, April 1

WHERE DOES THE WEEKEND COME FROM?

Of course, we can’t really answer that question until we finish setting the stage of the Industrial Revolution – so let’s finish our inquiry into how the Industrial Revolution changed the lives of working people!  To help us further unpack this question, we’re going to spend today contrasting the ideas we were presented with earlier this week; while our most recent essential question was “how did the Industrial Revolution move society backward?” today our essential question is “how did the Industrial Revolution move society forward??”

To unpack this question, we’re taking a look at two sources:

By the end of class, students will read and annotate the two sources, and record their responses on this here graphic organizer: The Industrial Revolution!!!  Finishing this work will require students to reference all of the work they’ve completed this week.

HOMEWORK:

Friday! March 29

Happy Friday! WHERE DOES THE WEEKEND COME FROM??

Recognizing that a proper response to this question forces us to identify the historical context of the Industrial Revolution, we need to spend a bit more time with a sub-essential question that will lay the foundation for our overarching essential question.  This week, we inquired into where people moved to and from during the Industrial Revolution, how daily life moved before and during the Industrial Revolution, and how were individual working people affected by the Industrial Revolution; today, our sub-essential question is…

How did the Industrial Revolution move society backward?

SOURCE IS BAE. Identify the primary and secondary source(s):

  1. Age Distribution of Child Workers in Cotton Factories (1818-1819)
  2. Friedrich Engles: excerpts from Conditions of the Working-Class in England, 1844
  3. Charles Dickens: fictional ‘Coketown’ – excerpt from Hard Times, 1854

By the end of class, students will develop a claim supported by evidence that explains how the Industrial Revolution moved society backward. Use this nifty The Industrial Revolution(!) to organize your ideas 🙂  Upon our return to school, we’ll flip today’s question and address how the industrial revolution moved society FORWARD.

HOMEWORK:

  • Make sure you’re all caught up with your daily responses.  Scroll through the most recent blog posts and ask yourself, “have I completed all this work!?”  Mr. C’s been diligent in handing back work the very next day, so all of what you need should be in your binder.

Thursday, March 28

Recognizing the work we’ve done thus far to set the stage of the Industrial Revolution so that we might better contextualize our overarching unit question of “where did the weekend come from?”  today we will inquire into how were individual working people affected by the Industrial Revolution? To help us understand the human cost of this period of accelerated growth in population, industry, and production, we will read excerpts from sources on the Industrial Revolution in England:

By the end of class, students will read and annotate the primary and secondary source documents,  using The Industrial Revolution!! to organize their ideas.

Wednesday, March 27

Happy Hump Day!  After a review of yesterday’s work related to shifting demographics of Great Britain during the Industrial Revolution, we continued to set ourselves up to assess our units overarching essential question of…

WHERE DOES THE WEEKEND COME FROM??

Recognizing that a proper response to this question forces us to identify the historical context of the Industrial Revolution, we need to spend a bit more time with a sub-essential question that will lay the foundation for our overarching essential question. We recently inquired into where people moved to and from during the Industrial Revolution.  Today our sub-essential question is:

How did daily life move before and during the Industrial Revolution?

To unpack this question, we’re working with 3 primary sources:

  1. Daniel Defoe: Tour Through the Island of Great Britain (excerpt), 1724.
  2. Interview with Former Child Laborer Michael Crabtree, 1832.
  3. British Parliamentary Papers: Statement on Factory Conditions, 1836.

By the end of class, students will:

  • Read and annotate the primary source documents.
  • Write a response to today’s sub-essential question: How did daily life move before and during the Industrial Revolution?  Answering this question requires students to refer back to the work they completed earlier this week  Students will use this here “How did daily life move before and during the Industrial Revolution?” worksheet to organize their ideas.

Tuesday, March 26

Let’s review some of the content associated with this massive shift in HOW goods are produced during this period of rapid economic expansion w’ yesterday’s work on “Setting the Stage for the Industrial Revolution.”  This entirely new unit of inquiry will center around our gigantic essential question:

WHERE DOES THE WEEKEND COME FROM?

To begin this inquiry, we need to begin with smaller sub-questions.  Today, our focus will be on the sub-question of:

Where did people move to and from during the Industrial Revolution?

To unpack today’s sub-essential question, we will examine a few sources that show the shifting demographics during the industrial revolution that allowed for the development of new, more efficient, ways to produce goods:

By the end of class, students will: 

Monday, March 25

Our previous unit focused on a variety of political and social revolutions in the Atlantic world during the Early Modern Era in America, France, and Haiti; now it’s time for us to examine the environmental, economic and socio-cultural revolutions of the burgeoning modern era of the Industrial Age.  With the massive amount of energy from newly discovered resources that will generate significantly more wealth than ever before, Mr. C’ will introduce a few different ideas of how that wealth should be organized with his lecture on  3 competing socio-economic systems, and students will address each w’:  Differentiating Capitalism, Socialism, and Communism.

Many of the cultural shifts ushering in the era of industrialization required new philosophies and ways to interpret a world undergoing rates of exchange that have never been seen before in human history.  There were a variety of thoughts on how people should harness the power of the early industrial age, including two competing economic philosophies of Capitalism and Socialism.

To get us thinking about the massive changes – no doubt ‘revolutionary’ – that are about to happen worldwide, we’re going to introduce industrialization by giving an overview of how the nature of work itself drastically changed: From Agriculture and Piecework to Industrialization.

How will new technologies accelerating the rate of exchange, commerce and wealth generation during the industrial revolution?

HOMEWORK due Friday at the end of Class: