Friday! March 29

Happy Friday! WHERE DOES THE WEEKEND COME FROM??

Recognizing that a proper response to this question forces us to identify the historical context of the Industrial Revolution, we need to spend a bit more time with a sub-essential question that will lay the foundation for our overarching essential question.  This week, we inquired into where people moved to and from during the Industrial Revolution, how daily life moved before and during the Industrial Revolution, and how were individual working people affected by the Industrial Revolution; today, our sub-essential question is…

How did the Industrial Revolution move society backward?

SOURCE IS BAE. Identify the primary and secondary source(s):

  1. Age Distribution of Child Workers in Cotton Factories (1818-1819)
  2. Friedrich Engles: excerpts from Conditions of the Working-Class in England, 1844
  3. Charles Dickens: fictional ‘Coketown’ – excerpt from Hard Times, 1854

By the end of class, students will develop a claim supported by evidence that explains how the Industrial Revolution moved society backward. Use this nifty The Industrial Revolution(!) to organize your ideas 🙂  Upon our return to school, we’ll flip today’s question and address how the industrial revolution moved society FORWARD.

HOMEWORK:

  • Make sure you’re all caught up with your daily responses.  Scroll through the most recent blog posts and ask yourself, “have I completed all this work!?”  Mr. C’s been diligent in handing back work the very next day, so all of what you need should be in your binder.

Thursday, March 28

Recognizing the work we’ve done thus far to set the stage of the Industrial Revolution so that we might better contextualize our overarching unit question of “where did the weekend come from?”  today we will inquire into how were individual working people affected by the Industrial Revolution? To help us understand the human cost of this period of accelerated growth in population, industry, and production, we will read excerpts from sources on the Industrial Revolution in England:

By the end of class, students will read and annotate the primary and secondary source documents,  using The Industrial Revolution!! to organize their ideas.

Wednesday, March 27

Happy Hump Day!  After a review of yesterday’s work related to shifting demographics of Great Britain during the Industrial Revolution, we continued to set ourselves up to assess our units overarching essential question of…

WHERE DOES THE WEEKEND COME FROM??

Recognizing that a proper response to this question forces us to identify the historical context of the Industrial Revolution, we need to spend a bit more time with a sub-essential question that will lay the foundation for our overarching essential question. We recently inquired into where people moved to and from during the Industrial Revolution.  Today our sub-essential question is:

How did daily life move before and during the Industrial Revolution?

To unpack this question, we’re working with 3 primary sources:

  1. Daniel Defoe: Tour Through the Island of Great Britain (excerpt), 1724.
  2. Interview with Former Child Laborer Michael Crabtree, 1832.
  3. British Parliamentary Papers: Statement on Factory Conditions, 1836.

By the end of class, students will:

  • Read and annotate the primary source documents.
  • Write a response to today’s sub-essential question: How did daily life move before and during the Industrial Revolution?  Answering this question requires students to refer back to the work they completed earlier this week  Students will use this here “How did daily life move before and during the Industrial Revolution?” worksheet to organize their ideas.

Tuesday, March 26

Let’s review some of the content associated with this massive shift in HOW goods are produced during this period of rapid economic expansion w’ yesterday’s work on “Setting the Stage for the Industrial Revolution.”  This entirely new unit of inquiry will center around our gigantic essential question:

WHERE DOES THE WEEKEND COME FROM?

To begin this inquiry, we need to begin with smaller sub-questions.  Today, our focus will be on the sub-question of:

Where did people move to and from during the Industrial Revolution?

To unpack today’s sub-essential question, we will examine a few sources that show the shifting demographics during the industrial revolution that allowed for the development of new, more efficient, ways to produce goods:

By the end of class, students will: 

Monday, March 25

Our previous unit focused on a variety of political and social revolutions in the Atlantic world during the Early Modern Era in America, France, and Haiti; now it’s time for us to examine the environmental, economic and socio-cultural revolutions of the burgeoning modern era of the Industrial Age.  With the massive amount of energy from newly discovered resources that will generate significantly more wealth than ever before, Mr. C’ will introduce a few different ideas of how that wealth should be organized with his lecture on  3 competing socio-economic systems, and students will address each w’:  Differentiating Capitalism, Socialism, and Communism.

Many of the cultural shifts ushering in the era of industrialization required new philosophies and ways to interpret a world undergoing rates of exchange that have never been seen before in human history.  There were a variety of thoughts on how people should harness the power of the early industrial age, including two competing economic philosophies of Capitalism and Socialism.

To get us thinking about the massive changes – no doubt ‘revolutionary’ – that are about to happen worldwide, we’re going to introduce industrialization by giving an overview of how the nature of work itself drastically changed: From Agriculture and Piecework to Industrialization.

How will new technologies accelerating the rate of exchange, commerce and wealth generation during the industrial revolution?

HOMEWORK due Friday at the end of Class:

Tuesday thru Friday! March 19-22

Let’s begin with a short read-around of yesterday’s review on the similarities and differences between the Columbian Exchange and the Atlantic Slave Trade.  This review will prime us for our inquiry into the Haitian Revolution!

Work this week is devoted entirely to the Haitian Revolution.  Students will begin work on a Document Based Question, and complete the work by Friday of this week.  Here is the link to our Haitian Revolution Inquiry.

Let’s take a brief inquiry into socio-cultural reactions to enslavement in the New World: capoeira.  Begin with what you know about chattel slavery.  Describe the style of capoeira as a martial art.  Explain the purpose of this style within the context of chattel slavery. (I.e.:  why does this martial art seem more like a dance than a contact-based martial art?)

HOMEWORK:  (ALL Due Friday)

Monday, March 18

Transitioning between two Atlantic world revolutions in the Early Modern Era, the French Revolution and the Haitian Revolution, we’re taking some time to consider a continuity that spanned the Atlantic Ocean throughout the Early Modern Era: The Atlantic Slave Trade.  The Ted-Ed video describes a coercive relationship that influenced all SECSEE aspects of world history.  We’ll begin with a short reading on that topic with a primary source reading: Olaudah Equiano’s 1789 narrative of boarding a slave ship.

Taking Equiano’s narrative, we broke into small groups and worked through our Slave Voyages Webquest to quantify the Atlantic Slave Trade across the middle passage.

Wednesday thru Friday! March 13-15

HOW REVOLUTIONARY WAS THE FRENCH REVOLUTION?  

Mr. Cameron will review some of the work completed this week to review some background content understanding, and then we’ll move forward in the chronology of the French Revolution to focus on the role of Napoleon Bonaparte: French Revolution (1789-1799)

How does Napoleon’s rise to power represent a continuation of, or an end to, revolutionary ideals? I.e.: How revolutionary was the French Revolution?

To unpack this question, we will work w’ the following sources:

  1. Napoleon’s account of his coup d’etat (1799)
  2. Napoleon’s Account of the Internal Situation of France (1804)
  3. Jacques-Louis David, painting: The Consecration of the Emperor Napoleon I and Coronation of the Empress Josephine (1807)
  4. Accessory to War: Technology Influencing the French Revolution (2018)

By the end of class on FRIDAY, students will respond to the following reading questions in this here response sheet, and submit this work along with the response sheet from Tuesday’s analysis of Max. Robespierre’s justification of violence during the Reign of Terror.

  • What is a Coup d’etat?  How was Napoleon primed to lead a coup d’etat?
  • What form of government did Napoleon use to unite France?
  • Recognizing your answer to the above question, how does Napoleon’s rise to power represent a continuation of, or an end to, revolutionary ideals?

Tuesday, March 12

HOW REVOLUTIONARY WAS THE FRENCH REVOLUTION?

Recognizing the work we completed yesterday, we can now move forward into the chronology of the French Revolution.  Mr. Cameron will introduce some of the conflicts of this ‘revolutionary’ era, so that students will be set up to respond to today’s sub-essential question:

How did leaders of the revolution justify the Reign of Terror, AND how were these justifications perceived by the greater French populous?

To unpack today’s question, we’re using two primary sources:

  1. Speech by Maximilien Robespierre: On the Moral and Political Principles of Domestic Policy (1793)
  2. Political Cartoon: All The French Guillotined, Beheads the Executioner with His Own Hand, 1793

By the end of class, students will use this here response sheet to respond to the following:

  • Write a summary of Robespierre’s justification for the Reign of Terror and identify two key details that support his justification.
  • Would Robespierre agree with how he is portrayed in the 1793 political cartoon?

Monday, March 11

HOW REVOLUTIONARY WAS THE FRENCH REVOLUTION?

That’s our overarching question this week!  On Friday, we considered the nature of a revolution, as well as some social, economic, and political factors leading up to the French Revolution.  Today, our essential question that will help us build upon our overarching question is:

How did the relationship between the French people and the Monarchy change in the early stages of the Revolution?

To unpack this question, we will take a look at three primary source documents:

  1. Decree Abolishing the Feudal System (1789).
  2. Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen (1789)
  3. Declaration of the Rights of Woman and Citizen (1791).